Animated Britain

As part of BFI’s Unlocking Film Heritage programme, YFA has added new titles from Yorkshire and the North East, expanding our Animation Collection.

The history of British animation dates back to at least 1904, when it was discovered that stop motion could add illusion to trick films and flourishes to intertitles.  Quickly, filmmakers began to add narrative using animation to bring interesting stories and characters to life.  From propaganda films of the First World War to cinema adverts of the ‘20s and ‘30s, British Animation began to evolve.  The launch of commercial television in Britain in 1955 fuelled the demand for adverts giving British animation a boost, and by the 1960s and ‘70s, more and more artists and amateur filmmakers began to use animation outside the commercial sphere. 

Newly digitized films include 10 titles by award winning South Shields-born animator Sheila Graber as well as WWI propaganda film John Bull’s Animated Sketchbook, whimsical stop motion animation Little Cinders from amateur filmmaker Jack Eley, Doug and Norah Brear's Pipe Dream and Kitchen Kaper, and the martial woes of Chunky Chimp in Eric Booth’s humorous animated short  Anthropoid Anecdote.

To see more of our Animation Collection, including the first animated advertisement to be made with synchronised sound, follow the links below.  

MR YORK OF YORK, YORKS (1929)

AS EASY AS ABC (1946)

AERO (1955-1951)

WINTER WONDERLAND FANTASY (1958)

NEWCASTLE CO-OP ADVERTS (1959)

NEW AT FENWICK (c.1969)

FENWICK CHRISTMAS ADVERT (1971)

FENWICK OF NEWCASTLE CHRISTMAS MAGIC (1957)

T'BATLEY FAUST (1979)

 

And more about the history of British Animation can be seen on BFI Player.