Film ID:
YFA 5867

THE VILLAGE OF WRAY AFTER THE FLOODS, 1967

1967

Visitor Tabs

Description

This is a film made by Eddie Percy of Settle which shows the aftermath and damage done by the flash flood in the village of Wray.  The flood took place on 8 August, 1967 where the River Roeburn flooded the Lancashire village.  Also included in the film is footage of Appleby Fair and the Settle Pram Race.  

Title – The Village of Wray after the floods, 1967

On a summer’s day, locals are milling around the Wray Bridge over the River Roeburn where entire walls have been knocked down leaving much debris.  Rubble is strewn along the river bank and piled up in front of houses which have walls missing.  There is a poster for the Lancaster Guardian appealing for donations for the Wray and District Flood Support Fund.  Two workmen are clearing rocks away from the side of the river. [02.46.19.0] A number 40 bus bound for Lancaster crosses over the bridge.  There is more evidence of collapsed building and rubble.  Pedestrians cross the bridge, which has a temporary fence for where the walls have collapsed.  The river is now quite low.  A bus crosses a temporary bridge with a weight restriction of 25 tons and speed restriction of 5 mph.

The next part of the film shows a camp of caravans for the Appleby Fair.  Here there are several wagons belonging to people from travellers’ communities, and some of the children play with donkeys.  There are horses in the nearby fields, and people are lounging around their caravans enjoying the sun.  Some of the caravans start to leave, passing a road sign for “Fair Hill”.

The final section of the film takes place in Settle Market Square where a pram race is about to get underway.  Some men are dressed as women, and they are pushing prams in which there are other men dressed as babies.  There is also at least one set of women competitors who are dressed in Boy Scout attire.  Three of them set off, neck and neck for some time.  A group of children are hanging around near a maypole drinking bottles of pop, “Vim!”