Film ID:
YFA 3426

SOUND EXERCISE (THE DAVID FROST SHOW)

1970

Visitor Tabs

Description

Sound only - Comedic sound exercise in which historical guests St. Francis, Cleopatra, Boadicea and Hitler visit a David Frost Show segment, 'If I Had My Life Again.'

Made in first year at Royal College of Arts.

A broadcast announcer's voice emerges from the sounds of traffic: 'The Frost Programme which follows is a recording of the programme shown live in London last night. Although some occurrences in it may be thought regrettable, it has been decided to leave it unedited so that tonight's viewers may judge for themselves.'
A recorded brass band fanfare drowns out the voice, and David Frost welcomes his audience to 'If I Had My Life Again, a series in which famous people are asked, "What would they do if they had their lives again?"' Throughout the programme, each time David says the phrase 'If I/you had my/your life again,' the tinny horn fanfare bursts onto the scene, interrupting him. The first guest is St. Francis of Assisi, who is accompanied by chirping birds and a religious choir and who confides, in a slow, deep drawl, that being a saint is no fun, that he has a fatal attraction for birds, and that he'd rather not live his life again. He returns to Heaven by rocket. Next, Cleopatra and Boadicea perform a striptease to catcalls and a bawdy burlesque band. Finally, the star guest, Adolf Hitler, arrives and machine guns the unappreciative audience. Eventually, he says that he would like to conquer the world by being a concert pianist. David evacuates the studio to the sound of police sirens, and Hitler brings in a piano by pulley and a stomping S.S. officer to turn his pages. The piece, 'Rise and Fall of the Piano,' is composed of snippets of several musical pieces some of which are piano recordings, some of which are symphonic. They include: the piano intro from 'Let it Be,' Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, a blues piano riff, and another, dramatic symphony, all of which are interspersed with gunshots and explosions. The sound exercise ends abruptly in the middle of David Frost's signoff.