Film ID:
YFA 1453

PEOPLE WORK HERE

1970

Visitor Tabs

Description

This is a documentary film exploring the new types of boats and ships that have recently emerged. The film discusses the new methods and materials used in the construction of ships, and new designs, such as the hovercraft. It features the ferry the Spiro.

Yorkshire Television Production
People Work Here - Sea

The film begins with a large oil tanker being launched, being watched by the ship workers. There is then a small RNLI rescue dinghy, followed by a flotilla of other small boats as the narrator explains all the different kinds of methods and material that are used in the construction of the many different kinds of boats and ships. Workers shovel coal into the furnace of a coal fired ship as the narrator explains that the last of these was twenty years ago. Ship building workers are shown on the Clydebank. As a ship is shown being built, the narrator explains the old process of building ships by riveting together specially cut pieces of metal, and that this process is now out of date. Computers in design, prefabrication and welding, now cut the time it takes to build a ship. Now many ships ordered in Britain are built in other countries.

The film switches to a large water tank in a laboratory where a model boat is being tested. The new method of building ships, using computers, automation and the construction of large prefabricated sections is shown. One such section is transported to be craned into position at Harland and Wolff.

The film switches again to the ferry the Spero, docked in Hull. The Captain explains the workings of the ship, using the engine order telegraph and other controls, including the automatic steering, the gyrocompass and the radar. A container is shown being loaded onto the Spero, and the Captain shows the hydraulic hatch cover.

Docked at Hull is one of the new stern and freezer trawlers, the Othello. The Skipper, Neville Beavers, runs through some of the aspects of the ship. A catch is shown being hauled aboard as Neville Beavers explains their advantages over the sidewinders. Once the catch is on board, the fishermen process the fish down below deck.

Then on to a hovercraft traveling across the English Channel to France, and the Hover Marine Two. An engineer working for Hovermarine, David Nicholas, shows the HM2 in a work station. He then explains the design of the new forthcoming HM4, standing over a model of the craft. The film finishes showing a hydrofoil vessel.

Film Editor Denis Skelton
Production Team Mary Robin, Alan Patient
Produced and Directed by Graham Watts
Acknowledgement to the Ellerman's Wilson Line, Hull.