Film ID:
YFA 1299

INVESTMENT CASTING BY DESIGN

1971

Visitor Tabs

Description

This is a Promotional film produced by Mottershaw Commercial Films of Sheffield for The British Investment Casters| Technical Association (BICTA).

A "modern data processing machine" is shown in close-up and the commentary explains that its parts need to be durable and of a high quality for smooth functioning.
(Music and title) - INVESTMENT CASTING BY DESIGN

There is a mock meeting between an investment casting consultant and four members of a company (the Designer, Director, Quality Manager and Production Manager) is staged to illustrate the benefits to industry of this process of production.

The consultant takes the clients and the audience through the stages of investment casting using the ceramic shell process by use of an illustrated wall-chart. He then shows the bold mould procedure. The consultant then shows some pieces made using these methods. Discussion then follows with a question posed by the designer about the range of alloys which can be used. This is followed by scenes of castings being tested to meet British Standards. The consultant points out that Investment Castings do not have a low ductility level, and states that it is a viable alternative to forging. Two examples of uses where repetitive stress is a factor are shown in textile manufacture and copier technology. The consultant lists further areas where investment casting can be used, some are then illustrated: armourment (a rifle); earthworks (a vehicle); and industrial production (a printing press).

The Production Manager asks how Investment casting compares with machining. He is told that it provides a reduction in capital expenditure, man hours, raw materials and wastage. Again with the use of an illustrated wall-chart, the consultant demonstrates the comparative cost savings between investment casting and machining form bar stock. The former is shown to cost one third of the price. The Director asks about the economic viability of investment castings. Examples of components of varying size and complexity are shown: a slide head; a knee joint; a dust collector; and a branch duct. After fielding questions on materials and consistency the consultant is presented with plans for consideration by the production manager. At this point the camera tracks away and a voice over explains about the various pamphlets available from the BICTA. The film ends with shots of the data processing machine; the earthmoving equipment and the printing press.